My work is a way to understand and listen, to take time to build and develop a trusted relationship with the transient beauty of our natural resources. 

 

I originally trained in Fashion Design, but in 1992 I decided to study Textile Design and specialise in Embroidery at Nottingham & Trent University. Working with thread is a necessity for me, time spent handling and working with materials gives me a deeper understanding and a more personal connection. The slow transformation and construction of new visual narratives is gained by exploring traditional techniques, such as hand embroidery, knit and weave. Freelancing and travel combined with socially engaged art projects are an integral part of my practice. Identity, responses to emotional situations, change and influences all provide questions and define moments in time. 

 

After graduating in 1995 an International Textile Agent sold my fabrics in London & America. I also worked for Liberty, and John Lewis designing and manufacturing fabrics, lighting, framed pieces and wall-hangings. At the Country Living Spring Fair, during 2002 I received a commission from the Japanese store, Takashimaya, to exhibit at the British Makers Promotion alongside the Princess Diana Althorpe Collection. Working and travelling along the East & West Coast of Japan had a profound effect on my practice as a research artist.

 

Audience development and uncovering historic and ancient artforms such as Hapa-Zome, Ikebana and natural dyeing also uncovered traditional Japanese aesthetics, such as Wabi Sabi. This world view centres on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. Within my processes I strive to maintain a strong sense of global responsibility and my approach is one of simplicity, co-creation, and collaboration. Telling stories through extraction of natural colour from flowers, herbs and weeds growing in my garden echoes the ephemeral and fragile quality of the threads. I invest a substantial amount of time and research into sourcing my biomaterials. I am currently studying for a Masters Degree at Norwich University of the Arts. A scientific collaboration with John Innes Centre in Norwich is currently underway, focusing on utilising an ancient Neolithic crop, the Grass Pea. I work hard and feel passionately that we should respect the industriousness, skill, and talent of traditional hand crafted possessions. 

© 2020 copyright Rights Reserved all images the sole property of Caroline Hyde-Brown